Learn English Podcast #42: Improving Pronunciation with AI-Human Technology

Study this video as a lesson on LingQ

Hi everyone and welcome to the link podcast with me Elle.

Today’s guest is Alexander Appel.

He is the co-founder of Lingo Mii, which is a hybrid AI-human English

pronunciation learning platform.

Before I chat with him, just a reminder that you can study all episodes of this

podcast on LingQ as an English lesson, listen to the audio and read along

with the transcript translating all the words and phrases you don’t know, adding

them to your own personal database.

You can then do vocabulary activities with those words and phrases.

You’ll see them highlighted differently in future lessons.

And don’t forget, you can create lessons of your own on LingQ with anything that

interests you in your target language.

So videos online, YouTube, Netflix shows, movies.

If you like to study from music lyrics, you’re really into the news

and wanna read the news in your target language, the world is your oyster.

You can create lessons with content you love.

Don’t forget to give us a, like a, share a review wherever you are listening.

We really appreciate it.

Alexander, thank you for joining me.

How are you today?

I’m good.

Thank you for having me, but everything’s going fine.

Excellent.

Good.

And we were just talking before I hit record.

Uh, we’re both in this, uh, heat wave.

You are in Colorado, right?

Yep

Right now.

And how, how hot is it today for you?

I think it’s in the nineties, maybe touching a hundred.

Oh my God.

Yeah.

Oh no, no, no, not good at all.

All…

I have two big, huge fluffy Japanese Akitas and they’re

like, I’m I’m not going outside.

I love those dogs.

They’re so, so cute.

Oh, that must be so tough.

They wearing huge fur jackets all the time.

Oh yeah.

A hundred percent.

Yeah.

Keeping mine inside.

I have a dog.

I walked her at eight o’clock this morning and she jumped in the

river and now she’s just collapsed.

Yeah 31 degrees.

Um, a little hot.

Yeah.

yeah, just a little bit.

Just a bit.

Yeah.

so, um, Alexander, as I mentioned, you are co-founder of Lingo Mii

and it’s an AI-human hybrid English pronunciation pronunciation system.

So tell us a little bit about how Lingo Mii.

Yeah.

So just for starters, we have two platforms on it.

We have one for our students, and then we have one for our teacher side.

For our students, all they have to do is just read the content,

speak to it, and then it’s going to grade them on intonation,

phonics, emotional and pausing.

Pausing is like, is the conversation actually going

or I’m going to be like hi….

you Know.

So it’s going to really kind of get a real world feeling and give the

students a grade on how the mouth and the tongue can have different

movements to help them better be understood by native English speakers.

For the teachers platform, the most difficulty that teachers have

today is actually getting talk time outside of the classroom.

So the way that they’re able to implement this is they can customize and input

their own content and it instantly gets translated into speaking activities.

It also has a scheduling feature and it also has, um, uh, uh, progress.

So what that means is that they can view and hear students to

help them prep for the next class

excellent.

Wow.

Um, and, and so I took a look, uh, around bit at Lingo Mii.

Do, do people who use the, um, system need to know the IPA, the

international phonetic alphabet.

So we, so yeah, so like, that’s always like a great question we come, come by.

The, the biggest thing with that is that we have learners who love it and they’re

just like, oh, that’s all I want to know.

And then we have our casual users that don’t really care.

So for that, I think it’s a good mix of that people who want to know

it or people who are interested.

It’s a good thing to just get a grasp of, especially for people who are

in, uh, Japan, because they always categorize things by Kanji or characters.

Right.

So they, I always tell all my students just think of an IPA as an character of

a sound and they grab it and they kind of think of it as a little bit easier.

But for the most part, it’s just easier to just know the mouth and the tongue

movements where you can see it at the beginning, middle or end of words.

Right.

I like that.

That’s a really good way of explaining it to Japanese students.

Yeah.

That’s like a kanji.

Okay.

Um…

definitely.

Yeah.

So then you spent some time, uh, teaching in Japan, correct?

Yes.

Yes.

I did about three years and I was teaching, uh, in schools and privately.

Nice.

I did three years too teaching in Japan, but I…

when were you there?

I actually creeped you.

That’s not the right thing, I did my research and looked at

your LinkedIn and said 20…

just creeping

…around 20, just creeping around the internet.

So we got it.

2018 is it that you were there?

Yeah, so I started, uh, 2017 February and then I left about 2020

right before the pandemic in March.

Oh, wow.

Okay.

Like literally the week I, I transferred through, uh, Korea.

And everyone’s in a hazmat suit and everyone’s just freaking out.

It was like, oh, okay, Hey, what’s going on?

Oh, oh, wow.

So you hit it like just as it was exploding then?

Yeah.

Yeah.

I was staying with my, one of my best friends in his family

and I was just joking around.

I’m like, oh, if I wanted a free seat on the train, I’ll just

cough cuz we didn’t know the seriousness of it back then, right?

And his dad just starts laughing and cracking up.

I’m like, what’s going on?

He’s like, I just came from Tokyo this morning.

That’s what I did the whole, uh, train, just cleared out.

I was like oh!

So what would’ve happened?

So you left before the lockdowns happened, but what would’ve

happened if you’d stayed?

Was it the case that if you were in Japan, you got to stay, but if you left, you

couldn’t come back in as a non-Japanese?

Yeah.

So I guess like, if I, if, if I didn’t leave, like I still had my

job and everything and they, they wanted me and, uh, actually, at

the time I had a modeling contract in Tokyo and acting contract.

So like, actually right when I hit my plane, my agent called me.

He’s like, we have like five auditions for you.

There’s uh, nothing I can do right now, but, um, so I could have kept

all that still going, and it was no problem, but I wanted to take a, a

stab at the business world and I wanted to do it with a Japanese company.

So I jumped in, I went into sports marketing, and then through just

the grapevine, I met my founder, Kyo Ueda, where we, we just kind of

sat in LA at a language exchange, a Japanese one, actually, and he was

the only person to speak Japanese.

So we just hit it off and we kept going over ideas and ideas and

ideas of why it was so difficult to learn languages, especially English

for non-native English speakers.

And we found out reading and writing wasn’t a problem.

We found out people who just wanted to listen didn’t have any problems, uh,

majority, but speaking was the difficulty.

And that’s where we came up with this idea of that we really wanted to give back.

And from a young age, my mother, she used to teach pronunciation.

She was actually my school nurse.

Oh, really?

Yeah.

Yeah.

So like I would hear her just teach people constantly.

And then I ended up starting teaching all my friends pronunciation

who were Japanese in college.

And then it went into all my…

when I was in Japan, that was my specialty.

So I just kind of kept going and going.

So it was kind of a blessing in disguise of me coming back in COVID.

Yeah.

Right, right.

And you’re usually based, you were saying before we, I hit record that you’re yeah.

Usually based out of LA, right?

Yeah.

We’re usually based in LA and we travel a lot back and forth, uh,

to Japan for just opportunities.

And I’ll be actually upcoming this month.

I’ll be doing a lot of traveling.

I’ll be probably in New York in September, California in August, and

then Texas the beginning of August.

Okay.

Wow.

So yeah, I just got a lot of, a lot of stuff going on.

Just no big deal.

Um, and how are you finding actually, I just wanna not related,

but how are you finding traveling?

I haven’t traveled for ages because I’ve heard it’s a nightmare, but how…

No, actually I’ve, I think it’s the best.

Like, well, like at the beginning I used to travel a lot during it.

Like right when COVID hit, I actually, uh, jumped on my motorcycle one cross country

and, you know, just did that for a while.

And then traveling on airlines it was like super cheap.

No one was on flights.

So it was like, no problem.

And now the price is starting to peak, but people are still kind

of, uh, a little worried, which is fine, but you usually get that

middle seat free and no one’s there.

So you kind of get the extension of it.

But the problem is that prices are going up.

Yeah.

Oh man.

Especially when I just came back from Tokyo two months ago, uh,

every single time I had that middle seat, so no problem.

That is…

what a score.

Yeah.

That’s fantastic.

As long as your luggage actually arrives with you, I guess is the, one of the

things that’s been going wrong a lot.

Oh really?

Anyway.

Yeah.

I didn’t know.

Anyway, that’s good that you haven’t experienced that.

Anyway back to, uh, pronunciation, English pronunciation.

So, um, you have this experience teaching in Japan.

what would you say are the, I guess just speaking from the Japanese native

speaker or mostly Japanese native speaker perspective, but what are

the most common issues that people have with English pronunciation?

Yeah, so like the, the biggest one is that it’s kind of everyone knows are R and Ls.

It’s the, the, the biggest one out there and there’s little tricks for that.

So for example, like when my mom used to teach this to get kids, she used

to focus on kids who had to speak better, that couldn’t roll their Rs.

Actually, my sister was one of ’em her name’s Ari.

And she would say “awee”.

Oh, that’s cute.

It was until my mom was like, I want you to speak correctly.

Uh, But, um, the funny thing was, is just, I always tell people, I’m like, if you

don’t wanna do the mouth that’s exercises, go to McDonald’s and go get a milkshake.

And they’re like, what?

I’m like, because when you drink through a straw, it’s going to be,

uh, such a high density it actually strengthens that tongue to curl.

Huh?

Okay.

So that’s the problem because with R one of the biggest problems

with that is that the tongue comes up right in front of the teeth.

It doesn’t touch it.

And then in the back it arcs.

Okay.

So it kind of looks like this.

And that’s a very, very hard movement for a lot of people.

So what I do is for, for mine, I go either drink a milkshake for a little

Hi everyone and welcome to the link podcast with me Elle.

Today’s guest is Alexander Appel.

He is the co-founder of Lingo Mii, which is a hybrid AI-human English

pronunciation learning platform.

Before I chat with him, just a reminder that you can study all episodes of this

podcast on LingQ as an English lesson, listen to the audio and read along

with the transcript translating all the words and phrases you don’t know, adding

them to your own personal database.

You can then do vocabulary activities with those words and phrases.

You’ll see them highlighted differently in future lessons.

And don’t forget, you can create lessons of your own on LingQ with anything that

interests you in your target language.

So videos online, YouTube, Netflix shows, movies.

If you like to study from music lyrics, you’re really into the news

and wanna read the news in your target language, the world is your oyster.

You can create lessons with content you love.

Don’t forget to give us a, like a, share a review wherever you are listening.

We really appreciate it.

Alexander, thank you for joining me.

How are you today?

I’m good.

Thank you for having me, but everything’s going fine.

Excellent.

Good.

And we were just talking before I hit record.

Uh, we’re both in this, uh, heat wave.

You are in Colorado, right?

Yep

Right now.

And how, how hot is it today for you?

I think it’s in the nineties, maybe touching a hundred.

Oh my God.

Yeah.

Oh no, no, no, not good at all.

All…

I have two big, huge fluffy Japanese Akitas and they’re

like, I’m I’m not going outside.

I love those dogs.

They’re so, so cute.

Oh, that must be so tough.

They wearing huge fur jackets all the time.

Oh yeah.

A hundred percent.

Yeah.

Keeping mine inside.

I have a dog.

I walked her at eight o’clock this morning and she jumped in the

river and now she’s just collapsed.

Yeah 31 degrees.

Um, a little hot.

Yeah.

yeah, just a little bit.

Just a bit.

Yeah.

so, um, Alexander, as I mentioned, you are co-founder of Lingo Mii

and it’s an AI-human hybrid English pronunciation pronunciation system.

So tell us a little bit about how Lingo Mii.

Yeah.

So just for starters, we have two platforms on it.

We have one for our students, and then we have one for our teacher side.

For our students, all they have to do is just read the content,

speak to it, and then it’s going to grade them on intonation,

phonics, emotional and pausing.

Pausing is like, is the conversation actually going

or I’m going to be like hi….

you Know.

So it’s going to really kind of get a real world feeling and give the

students a grade on how the mouth and the tongue can have different

movements to help them better be understood by native English speakers.

For the teachers platform, the most difficulty that teachers have

today is actually getting talk time outside of the classroom.

So the way that they’re able to implement this is they can customize and input

their own content and it instantly gets translated into speaking activities.

It also has a scheduling feature and it also has, um, uh, uh, progress.

So what that means is that they can view and hear students to

help them prep for the next class

excellent.

Wow.

Um, and, and so I took a look, uh, around bit at Lingo Mii.

Do, do people who use the, um, system need to know the IPA, the

international phonetic alphabet.

So we, so yeah, so like, that’s always like a great question we come, come by.

The, the biggest thing with that is that we have learners who love it and they’re

just like, oh, that’s all I want to know.

And then we have our casual users that don’t really care.

So for that, I think it’s a good mix of that people who want to know

it or people who are interested.

It’s a good thing to just get a grasp of, especially for people who are

in, uh, Japan, because they always categorize things by Kanji or characters.

Right.

So they, I always tell all my students just think of an IPA as an character of

a sound and they grab it and they kind of think of it as a little bit easier.

But for the most part, it’s just easier to just know the mouth and the tongue

movements where you can see it at the beginning, middle or end of words.

Right.

I like that.

That’s a really good way of explaining it to Japanese students.

Yeah.

That’s like a kanji.

Okay.

Um…

definitely.

Yeah.

So then you spent some time, uh, teaching in Japan, correct?

Yes.

Yes.

I did about three years and I was teaching, uh, in schools and privately.

Nice.

I did three years too teaching in Japan, but I…

when were you there?

I actually creeped you.

That’s not the right thing, I did my research and looked at

your LinkedIn and said 20…

just creeping

…around 20, just creeping around the internet.

So we got it.

2018 is it that you were there?

Yeah, so I started, uh, 2017 February and then I left about 2020

right before the pandemic in March.

Oh, wow.

Okay.

Like literally the week I, I transferred through, uh, Korea.

And everyone’s in a hazmat suit and everyone’s just freaking out.

It was like, oh, okay, Hey, what’s going on?

Oh, oh, wow.

So you hit it like just as it was exploding then?

Yeah.

Yeah.

I was staying with my, one of my best friends in his family

and I was just joking around.

I’m like, oh, if I wanted a free seat on the train, I’ll just

cough cuz we didn’t know the seriousness of it back then, right?

And his dad just starts laughing and cracking up.

I’m like, what’s going on?

He’s like, I just came from Tokyo this morning.

That’s what I did the whole, uh, train, just cleared out.

I was like oh!

So what would’ve happened?

So you left before the lockdowns happened, but what would’ve

happened if you’d stayed?

Was it the case that if you were in Japan, you got to stay, but if you left, you

couldn’t come back in as a non-Japanese?

Yeah.

So I guess like, if I, if, if I didn’t leave, like I still had my

job and everything and they, they wanted me and, uh, actually, at

the time I had a modeling contract in Tokyo and acting contract.

So like, actually right when I hit my plane, my agent called me.

He’s like, we have like five auditions for you.

There’s uh, nothing I can do right now, but, um, so I could have kept

all that still going, and it was no problem, but I wanted to take a, a

stab at the business world and I wanted to do it with a Japanese company.

So I jumped in, I went into sports marketing, and then through just

the grapevine, I met my founder, Kyo Ueda, where we, we just kind of

sat in LA at a language exchange, a Japanese one, actually, and he was

the only person to speak Japanese.

So we just hit it off and we kept going over ideas and ideas and

ideas of why it was so difficult to learn languages, especially English

for non-native English speakers.

And we found out reading and writing wasn’t a problem.

We found out people who just wanted to listen didn’t have any problems, uh,

majority, but speaking was the difficulty.

And that’s where we came up with this idea of that we really wanted to give back.

And from a young age, my mother, she used to teach pronunciation.

She was actually my school nurse.

Oh, really?

Yeah.

Yeah.

So like I would hear her just teach people constantly.

And then I ended up starting teaching all my friends pronunciation

who were Japanese in college.

And then it went into all my…

when I was in Japan, that was my specialty.

So I just kind of kept going and going.

So it was kind of a blessing in disguise of me coming back in COVID.

Yeah.

Right, right.

And you’re usually based, you were saying before we, I hit record that you’re yeah.

Usually based out of LA, right?

Yeah.

We’re usually based in LA and we travel a lot back and forth, uh,

to Japan for just opportunities.

And I’ll be actually upcoming this month.

I’ll be doing a lot of traveling.

I’ll be probably in New York in September, California in August, and

then Texas the beginning of August.

Okay.

Wow.

So yeah, I just got a lot of, a lot of stuff going on.

Just no big deal.

Um, and how are you finding actually, I just wanna not related,

but how are you finding traveling?

I haven’t traveled for ages because I’ve heard it’s a nightmare, but how…

No, actually I’ve, I think it’s the best.

Like, well, like at the beginning I used to travel a lot during it.

Like right when COVID hit, I actually, uh, jumped on my motorcycle one cross country

and, you know, just did that for a while.

And then traveling on airlines it was like super cheap.

No one was on flights.

So it was like, no problem.

And now the price is starting to peak, but people are still kind

of, uh, a little worried, which is fine, but you usually get that

middle seat free and no one’s there.

So you kind of get the extension of it.

But the problem is that prices are going up.

Yeah.

Oh man.

Especially when I just came back from Tokyo two months ago, uh,

every single time I had that middle seat, so no problem.

That is…

what a score.

Yeah.

That’s fantastic.

As long as your luggage actually arrives with you, I guess is the, one of the

things that’s been going wrong a lot.

Oh really?

Anyway.

Yeah.

I didn’t know.

Anyway, that’s good that you haven’t experienced that.

Anyway back to, uh, pronunciation, English pronunciation.

So, um, you have this experience teaching in Japan.

what would you say are the, I guess just speaking from the Japanese native

speaker or mostly Japanese native speaker perspective, but what are

the most common issues that people have with English pronunciation?

Yeah, so like the, the biggest one is that it’s kind of everyone knows are R and Ls.

It’s the, the, the biggest one out there and there’s little tricks for that.

So for example, like when my mom used to teach this to get kids, she used

to focus on kids who had to speak better, that couldn’t roll their Rs.

Actually, my sister was one of ’em her name’s Ari.

And she would say “awee”.

Oh, that’s cute.

It was until my mom was like, I want you to speak correctly.

Uh, But, um, the funny thing was, is just, I always tell people, I’m like, if you

don’t wanna do the mouth that’s exercises, go to McDonald’s and go get a milkshake.

And they’re like, what?

I’m like, because when you drink through a straw, it’s going to be,

uh, such a high density it actually strengthens that tongue to curl.

Huh?

Okay.

So that’s the problem because with R one of the biggest problems

with that is that the tongue comes up right in front of the teeth.

It doesn’t touch it.

And then in the back it arcs.

Okay.

So it kind of looks like this.

And that’s a very, very hard movement for a lot of people.

So what I do is for, for mine, I go either drink a milkshake for a little.

bit, but if you don’t wanna get the calories, I totally understand.

So I tell ’em to touch the tip, pull it back and then with your mouth, do

this weird motion where you tuck the bottom lip, cuz it’s gonna force it.

And I that’s one of the, the hardest ones for, for Japanese people to get.

The second one is the TH the TH sound with like “the”, because

again, we have that curling of the tongue and it vibrates through.

So they’re always going to do the air through the teeth and they’re going suck.

And I say, okay, the easiest way is we just put that

tongue out a little bit more.

I say, it’s not gonna be perfect, but a few times we practice

it, it’s gonna come through.

So those are two of the hard-hitting ones except for, oh.

And then the last one would be B and V.

B and V.

Okay.

Yeah.

So like bet and vet.

And, and again, like, these are just like little tiny tips to help people, but it’s

very easy once, you know it, cuz bet all you have to do is just, uh, tuck both

of the lips as in “bet” and overdo it.

That’s why I always tell my students and for the V sound have your bottom

lip to tuck it under the teeth “vet”.

And that’s all it is.

And people, when I, when I teach ’em that within a few lessons, maybe one or two,

their B and V kind of just become normal.

Fantastic.

Wow.

Um, I find, I find too, I don’t know if you found this in Japan.

Those are like the technical issues with pronunciation, but a big thing I found

was the kind of social or let’s call it like personal, like confidence issue.

Yeah.

You know, because as you say, you know, you need to stick your tongue

out to make that proper TH sound and a hundred not used to doing that.

That’s a little silly.

Maybe you might, you don’t wanna look odd or like, you know, definitely found that,

uh, in Japan, a country where people are very, you know, maybe not, they’re not,

so, uh, what’s the word I’m looking for?

Extroverted.

Outgoing.

Generally…

outgoing.

Yeah.

That’s a better word.

Outgoing.

Yeah.

Generally speaking of course.

Right.

But, um…

hundred percent.

Yeah, I found that too, for sure.

Have you had any…

how long has Lingo Mii been, been up and running now actually?

Yeah, we’ve been, uh, I think next month is gonna be about a year.

Oh, wow.

So super fresh.

Yeah.

Yeah.

So we’re fresh.

We actually just launched our, our MVP in May, but then right now we’re actually

restructuring it because we wanted to really add in that teacher screen.

So we’re gonna have everything finalized and finished by September

I think so that we can relaunch it.

Okay.

Yeah.

And as you mentioned, it’s a system for, uh, teachers and for students,

are there any kind of reviews or feedback that you’ve had so far that

you’ve been especially happy to hear?

Actually, yeah, there there’s a couple, um, we, we instantly have feedback from

our teachers and they love the idea of it and they want to implement it.

And they really see this beneficiary for speaking.

Cause again, it hits on that confidence thing.

And I I’ve dealt with this a lot where people didn’t wanna make

these weird mouth movements, but I, I tell ’em just do it for a week.

Go do it by yourself, go practice with the app.

And then once they do, they get over that fear, cuz then it goes away.

Cause you don’t have to do it so big.

And then they have more confidence in speaking or asking me even questions.

Cause the, the biggest problem for the teacher’s side they’re like I’ve

had people who have a 900 TOEIC but they can’t introduce themselves.

I said, yeah, I’ve been there too.

And that’s the problem.

They know the material, but they don’t feel confident in telling me it.

So for the teacher side, fantastic.

Cuz they love all the implementations and everything.

And for the student side, the biggest thing that they, they wanted is

they wanted instant translation.

So what we did is we took that note and then, uh, we also took um, a

look at the market and saw how we can actually help both fields more.

So we built an instant translation that can instantly read.

So we have that up actually for our web edition, where people can just type

in and they instantly get fed their information and scoring, but then we’re

also fixing and we’re creating that right now is basically a walkie talkie.

So say that you’re in a classroom with like five people and you have your

homework or your assignment from the teacher, cuz it’s uploaded, and then

you go, man, I really want to practice you can hit that person up and then

you guys can practice the conversation together instead of the AI so that

you guys can do the walkie-talkie.

Yeah.

So we have that because we all know schedules, no matter

what language we learn…

i, I remember when I was learning Japanese and I was like, I have no one to practice

with, like, and I have no feedback.

So it just, it just killed me.

So, and I would always be at home or I’d always be at.

So I didn’t have that time.

So this is kind of built for those people who want to have that extra

study who want to have that extra thing.

And how is your Japanese?

Did you get, are you still it’s getting with it?

Are you doing it still yeah?

It’s still good.

Uh, so like for, sometimes in our meetings we speak English,

but then I have to switch.

And then especially when I, when I was in Tokyo for about two months, I was

there from April to May, the end of may.

And I was going to so many networking events and they were like, oh, you

have to pitch in, uh, Japanese.

I was like, uh, okay, like, we’ll give this a try, no problem.

So, and like for business side, it really like scaled up.

But like my casual is still pretty good.

I can get by.

Let’s put it that way.

If I, if I need to go have a good conversation, make some people laugh.

That’s not a problem.

Oh, excellent.

That’s a great position to be in.

Nice.

yeah.

So, um, what’s in in store for Lingo Mii?

As you said, you’re about to celebrate your kind of one year anniversary.

Yeah.

So right now we’re actually, um, just getting revamped up.

So right now we have, uh, three schools in talking.

Some of ’em are actually kind of big players of that…

they want to get in and try our products.

So we gave them our web edition for a month to try out.

Then next we’re gonna start, uh, rolling out when our updates come out so that

they can use it so we can get our pilot.

So when our pilot comes in, we get our test feedback, then we can jump

up and start selling even more.

But right now we have three universities that are in, uh, sorry, one university and

two language schools that are interested.

Excellent.

Wow.

So lots going on.

Wow.

Yeah, just busy, busy, busy.

excellent.

Well, Alexander, thank you so much for chatting with me.

I’ll pop the link of course to Lingo Mii in the description.

Okay.

Um, yeah.

I hope the weather the cools down for you there in Colorado,

and your dogs are not too hot.

I know I’m surprised when you were talking about how Canada was so hot.

I was like, man, I thought it’d been a little bit colder right now.

Yeah, it’s not usually, I mean, last year we had the whole heat dome thing.

If you were in LA, you, you must have had it too.

Got to 41 degrees here.

I was in, I was a little bit south.

So at that time I was always, I was always at the beach, but, uh…

yeah.

I don’t know if this is the norm now.

I hope not, but, um…

Man I hope not.

Yeah.

Well, we’ll see.

Hopefully it gets better.

Yeah.

Yeah.

Fingers crossed.

Well, uh, have a great rest of your day Alexander and thank

you so, so much for joining me.

Yeah.

Thank you too.

And thanks for having me on and hope everything gets blessed

with you in your career.

Cheers.

Thank you.

Take care.

No problem.

Bye

Bye

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